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TheYezgo677

''Gaming PC'' Does it worth the money?

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So,I decided I want something big for my birthday.I came up with a gaming pc,but the problem is when i checked the price's of them,they are like 1000 pound's.So i decided i build my own gaming pc,I went on the internet and searched the stuff in it,counted the money of the stuff wand it still came up to 1000 pounds.But i didn't give up,not yet.I went on the internet again,and last time i wanted a GTX 980 which was 475 pounds which is how much my WHOLE pc worth.I coulden't believe it.But i was thinking searching,later on i found a good way of buying video card's....If u buy 2 GTX 960 it's around 300 pounds,1 GTX 980 is 475.Also if u buy 2 GTX 960 than ur pc's producement will be BIGGER and u didn't spend that much money.Simple and easy..Another thing,guys, dont buy these 5TB pc's cause what's the point.I think i have 2 or 1TB in my pc and i bearly used the space.I would say a 2-3TB pc would be perfect cause these 4-5 cost more and u don't even use the amount of space.Bye guys and good luck,hope u understood what i said and also took note of my advice.Never give up! :)

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For my next PC upgrade I'm probably gonna get an SSD, just so I can load the computer up faster and run games faster :D

(Of course keep games on HDD and switch to SSD when needed) :)

I agree a 980 is expensive, but if you're just playing CSGO or whatever, you simply don't need it, I've got the notoriously cheap, power efficient, decent performance 750ti and it works a charm. :D

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I could write an essay in this discussion, so I'll try to keep it short.

 

Your best bet is to go for just one GTX960 for now (unless getting two of them for cheaper is an offer you found), as pretty much no games out there are gonna push the card to it's limit anyway (I'm still on just one GTX560ti since 2012 for two monitors, and I'm only now starting to find games that I can't run in full beautifulness), let alone two cards combined. And if you are determined to go for a dual card SLI set up then ensure the motherboard is actually capable of doing it; not all motherboards support a dual SLI set up. Plus running two cards will need a more powerful PSU (there are tools online to see what sort of power you will need, but I imagine 700W-800W area would be about right) and all these differences can increase the price you were expecting to spend if you have to change certain things from one to another.

 

The most important thing to realise is what areas you can afford to skimp on and which you cannot. Motherboard and CPU you NEED them to be amazing, else nothing else you buy will even matter. SSDs/HDDs are mostly down to personal taste - having your OS on your SSD is really the main point of even buying an SSD, and if you're not that bothered about waiting a bit longer for your computer to boot then it's probably not worth the cost. HDDs are mostly fine to choose from, but I would only buy them from reputable brands, otherwise you're risking a lot just to save some cash. Buy a good, solid HDD to start and worry about SSDs and bigger HDDs later - they're not as important as other stuff.

 

The most important thing, overall, is to make sure the heart and brain of your computer is the best it can be, otherwise all the fancy stuff you slap on top of it just won't matter. Processor, motherboard, RAM, graphics, PSU and THEN everything else. This is where buying retail desktops is at its biggest fault; they advertise gaming computers with the latest graphics cards, and then you find out later it's a cheap motherboard and cheap processor with not much RAM, and you need to upgrade them anyway... so you spend more than if you built it yourself.

 

Overall, building it yourself works out A LOT cheaper than buying retail desktops (if you compare the specs of what you're buying); the bit that gets awkward is that if something stops working you don't have a support centre or warranty or anything, and fixing it could be expensive. Therefore just buy reputable parts from reputable retailers and reputable brands, else you're pretty much asking for trouble.

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I'd recommend the GTX 960 too (4gb), has the new Maxwell architecture (it's good ;) ) and if you can get the 4gb one, it might not prove to be great to start with (i.e. If you're just playing CS:GO or GMOD) but when you start playing open world games that need VRAM like GTA V and some of the upcoming titles, it will definitely start to shine. Not to mention with DirectX 12 it will get even better performance. :D

Of course as I said I've still got a GTX 750ti, but the GTX 960 is not very expensive, is more modern, and is better. (Certainly the GPU I want :) )

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Don't get an SSD. You can save money and spend it on other components or even peripherals. If you want a good speed with good storage (2tb or so) Get an SSHD (Solid State Hard Drive - Also known as a Hybrid drive).

They're faster than any regular HDD, offer the same storage, and are much much cheaper than an SSD.

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